Skin Deep, Published.

There’s a file on my computer with the title MYSTIDEA.TXT. It’s dated 4/27/1993. If someone were to ask me the exact date when I started this book, that’s the date.

There’s another file on my computer titled CH1 — no extension. Not sure how that happened, but the file loads just fine. At the top of that file is another date: 7/16/93. If someone were to ask me the exact date when I wrote the first words of Skin Deep, that’s the date.

Granted, the end product bears little resemblance to my initial notions, but that’s how long it took.

Happy birthday, Skin Deep. That was a very long labor.

To celebrate your entry into the literary world, here’s one of your godparents:

Look for more godparents to drop by as the week progresses, until we celebrate you properly with your book launch.

Skin Deep Virtual Book Launch

with Odyssey Bookstore

Saturday, July 25, 2020 at 7PM–8 PM ET

https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcudOigpzwjHNHZI-bT-lAzVhEymp__rMDT

Wanna Hear an Ad for Skin Deep?

There’s a really good one at Writer’s Routine, a podcast by Dan Simpson. What a pleasure it is to have a professional pitch your book!

The ad appears about 2 minutes in (around -52:25 if you are using the player above), but I suggest you listen to the whole episode, as it’s excellent. I wasn’t aware of Jasper Fforde before this interview, but I surely do now and am better for it.

12 Novels You Should Read in July – CrimeReads

Big thanks to the kind folks at CrimeReads for highlighting Skin Deep in their July roundup!

Here’s more evidence that the private detective is enjoying a very welcomed resurgence in the crime fiction world. Sung J. Woo’s new novel features an inimitable PI, Siobhan O’Brien, a Korean adoptee who has somewhat haphazardly inherited her old boss’s agency and finds herself at a crossroads, unsure if she should continue down the line. The proverbial last job comes through, dragging Siobhan upstate to a seemingly idyllic liberal arts college with a girl gone missing from her dorm. The college is a hotbed of subcultures, and Siobhan has to learn each of their quirks and rivalries to keep the case moving forward. Skin Deep manages to be an entertaining, wickedly clever mystery and also a thoughtful meditation on adoption, culture, and identity. –DM

CrimeReads